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Couples need to carefully consider which guests will be extended the option to bring a ‘plus one’ to the wedding.

Making a wedding guest list is seldom an easy task. Couples often find that many people are worthy of an invitation, which can make creating a guest list tricky for those with budgets in mind.

According to data from the online wedding resource The Knot, the average wedding catering cost per guest is roughly $70. However, catering costs will vary depending on the reception venue, the number of guests, the foods chosen, and the region of the country where the wedding takes place.

When creating their guest lists, couples may wonder if they have to offer all guests the option of bringing a “plus one” to the occasion. As with other wedding day etiquette questions, the plus one concept is not set in stone.

Any guest who is married

It’s typically standard to invite a couple as a whole to the wedding, even if you’ve never met the spouse. This often comes up when inviting work friends, according to Vogue magazine. Even if you have never interacted with a coworker’s spouse, etiquette dictates that all married guests be allowed to bring their spouses along.

Any guest who is engaged or is in a serious long-term

relationship

It can be challenging to know the relationship status of everyone who will be invited to the wedding, but chances are you’ll have a good idea of those people closest to you. Include a plus one for guests who are engaged or in long-term relationships.

Consider guests who may not know others

Weddings often are times when childhood friends reconnect, or people who haven’t seen each other in a while come together. If there’s a good chance someone who is single and is invited to the wedding may not know anyone else there except the couple, extend a plus one as a courtesy.

Include the wedding party

All members of the wedding party should be offered the option of bringing a date to the wedding.

Apart from these guidelines, couples can establish any other rules, such as no plus ones for guests under a certain age or those who are not in serious relationships. The Knot also says it is polite to find out who the plus one will be so that wedding reception seating cards include that person’s name instead of “and guest.”

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